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Generating Hair Follicle Cells and Hair Using Wharton's Jelly Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Track Code: 
12KU056M
Summary: 

Method of restoring hair and treating baldness by using cell culture systems and inducing mesenchymal cells to differentiate into CK19-positive cells capable of regenerating hair.

Overview: 

Mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The youngest, most primitive mesenchymal stem cells can be obtained from the umbilical cord tissue, namely Wharton's jelly and the umbilical cord blood. However, mesenchymal stem cells are found in higher concentration in the Wharton's jelly. The umbilical cord is easily obtained after the birth of the newborn. This invention includes cell culture systems and methods for inducing mesenchymal cells to differentiate into CK19-positive cells. The mesenchymal stem cells used are derived from Wharton's jelly matrix from umbilical cords that are stimulated to produce hair follicle cells and hair structure.

Applications: 

Restore hair and treat baldness.

How it works: 

Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells are considered mesenchymal cells that are capable of differentiating into cells of mesodermal origin. Recent research suggests that ectodermal differentiation from mesenchymal cells is possible.  CK19-positive cells and hair-like structures from Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells are generated using two separate methodologies that utilize osteogenic media to induce Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation.

Benefits: 

The method can be used for restoring hair, which can potentially solve the problem of baldness.

Why it is better: 

Current technology simply isolates cells from pre-existing hair shafts. This new method derives mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly matrix and stimulates them to produce hair follicle cells and hair structure. Hair can be restored and baldness can be treated.

Licensing Associate: 
Aswini Betha, PhD · abetha@ku.edu · 785-864-1775
Subcategory(s): 

Additional Information

Inventor(s):

  • Lynda Bonewald
  • Omar Aljitawi

Patent(s):

  • US 9,814,802

Status:

  • Patented
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